5 Gallon Bourbon Mash Recipe

How To Make 5 Gallon Moonshine Mash?

How much moonshine will 5 gallons of mash make?

A 5 gallon run will yield 1-2 gallons of alcohol. A 8 gallon run will yield 1.5-3 gallons of alcohol. A 10 gallon run will yield 2-4 gallons of alcohol.

How much mash do I need for a 5 gallon still?

For example, for every 1 gallon of water, you would use 1 pound of sugar, and 1 pound of corn meal. So for a 5 gallon mash (which is recommended for your first batches of moonshine) you would use 5 gallons of water, 5 pounds of corn meal, and 5 pounds of sugar.

How much sugar do I need for 5 gallons of mash?

Assuming you add enough grains to craft a 6.3% ABV beer, according to the chart, you’ll need to add at least 1lb of sugar to hit a potential alcohol of 7.5%, because adding 1lb of sugar will increase the potential alcohol by 1.2% for a 5 gallon batch.

How much yeast do I use for 5 gallons of mash?

Distillers Yeast If there are no directions we suggest 1 tablespoon of yeast per 5 gallons of mash.

What kind of water do you use to cut moonshine?

One of the most important tips I can give to moonshiners is to always use distilled water for making moonshine wash. It’s no secret that tap water contains a plethora of chemicals, some of which includes chlorine, chlorate, bromate and fluoride.

How much methanol is in 5 gallons of mash?

If 5 gallons of wine containing the abovementioned concentration of methanol ( 329mg/L ) were distilled, there could be as much as 8 mL of methyl alcohol in the first jar – a potentially dangerous amount.

Can you put too much sugar in moonshine mash?

The reason why you use sugar in a mash is basically because your yeast consumes the sugar, converting it into alcohol. However, too much sugar in your mash can actually hinder your yeast’s ability to make alcohol, and most people want to get as high an alcohol content as possible when making moonshine.

What is the best corn for moonshine?

The kind of corn for moonshine that we recommend is cracked, dry yellow corn, and yes, it’s field corn. It should be a good grade corn that is relatively clean.

Can you use cracked corn for moonshine?

What Type of Corn Should I use in my Moonshine? Our favorite type of corn to be used in moonshine is cracked, dry yellow corn. This type of corn is considered field corn and it needs to be clean and food-grade. It is recommended to use air dried corn rather than gas dried.

Can you put too much yeast in moonshine mash?

The “ 100 grams of dry yeast per 5 gallons” rule only applies to a pure sugar mash where you aim to turn it into vodka or as a base spirit for liquors. Fermenting a wort with more than 4 grams of yeast per gallon will effect undesirable sulfur flavors that can be difficult to get rid of.

Can you make alcohol with just water sugar and yeast?

The key ingredient, sugar, is converted into alcohol by the process of fermentation by the second ingredient, yeast. Homemade liquor can be made easily if you have sugar, water (to form a sugar solution) and baking yeast.

Why was moonshine made illegal?

So why is moonshine still illegal? Because the liquor is worth more to the government than beer or wine. Uncle Sam takes an excise tax of $2.14 for each 750-milliliter bottle of 80-proof spirits, compared with 21 cents for a bottle of wine (of 14 percent alcohol or less) and 5 cents for a can of beer.

Should I stir my mash during fermentation?

You should not stir your homebrew during fermentation, in most cases, as it can contaminate the beer with outside bacteria, wild yeast, and oxygen which leads to off-flavors or spoilage.

Can you use bread yeast for moonshine?

Bread Yeast – If your making a rum or corn whiskey mash recipe Bread yeast is one of the best yeast for the job. To learn more about using Bread yeast in Rum, Whiskey, Bourbon or Moonshine Mash recipes read our article Bourbon, Whiskey, Vodka and Moonshine – How Much Yeast?.

How do you speed up the fermentation of moonshine?

So, say you brew 5 gallons of beer day one, aerate and pitch an adequate yeast pitch for that size beer, then put 5 more gallons on top of that 12-24 hours later you will drastically speed up fermentation time. Just be sure to aerate each batch well.

How Commercial Moonshine Mash is Made

Firstly, a quick reminder that distilling alcohol is unlawful unless you have an approved federal fuel alcohol or distilled spirit plant authorization in addition to the appropriate state permissions. Our distillation apparatus is intended solely for legal reasons, and the information contained in this paper is intended solely for educational purposes. We encourage you to read our comprehensive legal statement for further information on the legality of distillation. Moonshine mashes can be made in three different methods, according on the experience of a commercial distiller.

The third approach is inexpensive and simple (and is a suitable starting point for new commercial distillers), but it is not advised for anyone who is serious about producing a high-quality product of consistent quality.

Beginning with the third recipe on this page, a rookie commercial distiller or a distillery that specializes on producing rapid, inexpensive liquor for the purpose of flavoring would be well advised (sugar shine).

The “thin mash” recipe might serve as a good middle ground.

1- Corn Whiskey

Corn sold for a few dollars at market could readily generate several hundred dollars after being mashed, fermented, and distilled, according to early American farmers. Corn also produces a higher output of sugar than other grain crops. In this way, crushing maize and converting it into alcohol became the traditional technique of alcohol production on the early American frontier, giving rise to the term “corn whiskey.” When it comes to crafting a craft spirit, a commercial distiller who wants to produce a high-quality finished product would assume that pure, all-grain whiskey is the way to go.

Listed below is a straightforward method for creating a corn whiskey mash, with some extra alternatives available for the more experienced distiller:

  • The following ingredients: 5 litres of water
  • 8.5 lbs of flaked maize
  • 1.5 lbs of crushed malted barley
  • Yeast- Read this article to find out how much yeast a professional distiller would need in their process.

Procedure:

Bring 5 gallons of mash water to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. When the desired temperature is attained, remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the 8.5 pounds of corn. The temperature should decrease to 152F after 5 minutes of constant stirring. After that, stir for a few seconds every five minutes until the temperature reduces to that level. Once the desired temperature has been reached, add in the malted barley. Cook for 90 minutes, uncovering only to stir every 15 minutes or so, until the vegetables are tender.

Allow it to sit for a few hours, or use an immersion chiller to cool the mash to 70 degrees Fahrenheit in minutes.

Fermentation will be completed in a week or two at most. Allow it to rest for another week, and it will be ready to distill at that point. Siphon the stillness out of the room. Make sure to discard any yeast or other sediment that may have accumulated.

Tips for Advanced Distillers

Advanced distillers might consider adding 2 teaspoons of gypsum (CaSO4) to the mash water and altering the pH of the mash water to a range between 5.8 and 6.0 before adding any other additives to the mash water. Following the addition of gypsum, the pH of the mash water should be adjusted lower using citric or tartaric acid. Calcium carbonate should be used if the pH has to be raised (CaCO3). Using tincture of iodine to evaluate if all starches have been entirely transformed into sugar is a second tip for expert distillers who want to improve their skills.

Drop a drop or two of the tincture of iodine onto the sample on the plate and allow it to dry.

Rest it for a longer period of time.

2 – Thin Mash Whiskey

Cooking a thin mash is a simple method for doubling the amount of mash produced while maintaining part of the natural grain taste of corn whiskey produced. Making it involves beginning with a puree, such as the one seen above, and then adding additional water and granular sugar to enhance the amount of wash produced.

Ingredients:

  • The following ingredients: 10 gallons of water (5 gal to begin, then 5 more)
  • 8.5 pounds of flaked maize
  • 1.5 pounds of crushed malted barley
  • 6-8 pounds of sugar

The following ingredients: 10 gallons of water (5 gal to begin with, then 5 more); 8.5 pounds of flaked maize; 1.5 pounds of crushed malted barley; 6-8 pounds of sugar

Procedure:

The process of making a thin mash is completed in two parts. To begin, prepare the normal corn whiskey mash as instructed previously. After the last resting period, however, add 5 gallons of cold water and 6-8 pounds of sugar to the pot. The mash is ready for aeration and fermentation when the temperature has dropped to 96 degrees Fahrenheit, as indicated in the Corn Whiskey recipe above. Advanced distillers should aim for a specific gravity of roughly 1.08 in their final product. If the concentration is too high, dilute with water.

3- Sugar Shine

Genuine maize whiskey is becoming increasingly difficult to get these days. Modern moonshine is almost always little more than plain sugar with a dash of flavoring added in for good measure. Although it is not as smooth as maize whiskey, what it lacks in flavor and smoothness is more than compensated for by the ease with which it may be consumed. In addition, some people are not fond of the flavor of maize. They would choose apple pie, peaches, or other fruit tastes over anything else. This recipe is perfect for making that particular concoction.

Procedure:

These days, authentic corn whiskey is hard to come by. Modern moonshine is almost always little more than plain sugar with a dash of flavoring added on top of it. It is not as smooth as maize whiskey, however, what it lacks in flavor and smoothness is more than compensated for by its ease of use. Furthermore, some people are not fond of the taste of maize.

They’d rather have apple pie, peaches, or other fruit flavors instead of the standard vanilla flavor. This recipe is perfect for making that particular concoction, as you can see in the photos. The following is the procedure for creating a sugar shine wash: Ingredients:

Is Making Moonshine Legal:

Real maize whiskey is becoming increasingly difficult to get these days. Modern moonshine is frequently little more than plain sugar with a dash of flavoring. Despite the fact that it is not as smooth as corn whiskey, what it loses in flavor and smoothness is more than compensated for by its ease of use. Furthermore, some people are not fond of the flavor of maize. They’d choose apple pie, peaches, or other fruit tastes over anything else. This recipe is perfect for making that things. Here’s how to make a sugar shine wash: Ingredients:

A Brief History of Moonshine:

The Great Depression, Prohibition, and limited access to the mountainous region of Appalachia all contributed to the creation of moonshine, a beverage that is now practically forgotten yet has a legendary reputation. The phrase “Moonshine” used to be used to refer to any type of homemade whiskey. In part, the word came up as a result of the fact that early “bootleggers” frequently brewed their whiskey in the middle of the night, under the light of a full moon, in order to keep their activities hidden from neighbors and the authorities.

In the case of moonshine, there is no conventional formula; it can be produced using any mix of grains in any style of still.

How to Make Moonshine – How to Make Booze

Moonshine (also known as corn whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage with strong historical roots, particularly in American history, therefore it stands to reason that people would and should be knowledgeable about how to manufacture their own moonshine. When it comes to moonshine, if you are unaware of what it is precisely, please feel free to read this page, where you can gain some basic background and facts about the beverage. When people think about homemade alcohol, the word “moonshine” is frequently the first thing that comes to their minds.

You might be interested:  How To Remove Corn From The Moonshine Wash? (Solution found)

And now that we have established the general procedure for creating moonshine, let’s get down to business.

Step 1: Understanding the ProcessBasic Terms

Making moonshine consists on three key procedures: Making the Mash and Fermenting the Mash are the first two steps. 3) Making the Mash into a Liquor After that, we’ll go over a few brief and fundamental words related to moonshine, which we’ll go over in more detail later.

  • Mash is the material that is created, which is subsequently fermented and distilled to produce moonshine
  • It is also known as mash whiskey. a still is a piece of equipment in which the mash is distilled, where the mash is boiled and then condensed to produce the liquid
  • Distillation takes place in the still, and it is this process that transforms the low-alcohol mash into high-alcohol moonshine. *For further information about distillation, please see this page.
  • Fermentation is the process of turning a mash into an alcoholic beverage by converting the carbohydrates in the mash into alcohol. This is a natural occurrence
  • There is nothing to fear.

Step 2: The IngredientsEquipment

While the components used to manufacture a moonshine mash might range significantly from one another, there are hundreds of distinct varieties and tastes of moonshine available, each with its own unique formula. However, one thing that is consistent throughout all moonshine ingredients is the requirement for yeast, a nutrition (typically grain or sugar), and water.

Many recipes also include a malted component, such as barley or rye, which is common in beer. The following instructions will teach you how to manufacture a simple corn-based mash that will provide an authentic form of moonshine liqueur. The ingredients you’ll need are as follows:

  • Cornmeal, sugar, water, yeast (Distillers yeast is suggested), and salt

You will require a still to make moonshine, or any other type of liquor for that matter; it is the single most critical component of the process. If you want to create numerous batches of moonshine or other homemade whiskey, I HIGHLY suggest investing in a still; believe me when I say that it will save you a great deal of time, work, misery, and money. It is feasible to construct a still; however, a still constructed incorrectly will be useless and even harmful. Please see this page for further information on the pros and cons of purchasing vs renting a still.

  • In order to make moonshine, or any type of liquor for that matter, you will want a still, which is the single most critical component. You should get a still if you want to manufacture many batches of moonshine or other homemade booze. Trust me, it will save you a lot of time, work, pain and money in the long run! A still can be constructed
  • However, a still constructed incorrectly will be useless and perhaps harmful.. More information about purchasing vs. purchasing a still may be found in this article. Additionally, you will require the following items in addition to the still —

Step 3: The Recipe

You’ll need a still to make moonshine, or any type of booze for that matter; it’s the single most critical component of the process. You should get a still if you want to manufacture numerous batches of moonshine or other homemade booze. Trust me, it will save you a lot of time, work, pain and money in the long run. It is feasible to construct a still; however, a still constructed incorrectly will be useless and perhaps harmful. For additional information on purchasing vs. purchasing a still, please see this page.

Step 4: Making the Mash

Here is where we will really start putting the components together and putting the moonshine together for the first time. Making this moonshine mash is not difficult or time-consuming; all you need to do is the following:

  1. Preparing the water: Bring the water to a mild temperature, around 90-100 degrees Fahrenheit. Add the corn meal to the water and stir for a couple of minutes (if you’re doing this while the heat is still on, make sure it’s lukewarm and swirl the bottom well to avoid burning any of the cornmeal)
  2. Add the sugar to the mashed potatoes and continue to stir for a few more minutes. Continue swirling until the mixture seems to be mostly dissolved.

*Tip* If you don’t have a large enough pot for the mash and don’t want to spend the money on a larger one, simply divide the mash into two or three batches. Yes, believe it or not, that is all there is to creating the mash. Isn’t it rather straightforward? Now we may begin the fermentation process, which will result in the production of alcohol! This is really amazing stuff!

Step 5: Fermentation

Fermentation is the final process before to distillation and is the most time-consuming. In this phase, we will turn our mash from a non-alcoholic to an alcoholic beverage by adding alcohol. All alcoholic beverages, including beer, wine, whiskey, brandy, moonshine, and other specialty beverages, are produced through this naturally occurring process. Fermentation is the starting point for all alcoholic beverages, including beer. So let’s get this party started!

  1. The first step is to pour your mash into your fermenting container, which may be anything that has an airtight cover that can be secured with a rubber band or other type of airlock. A 5 gallon water cooler jug serves as an example of a low-cost fermenter. If you’re a novice, I recommend investing in a bucket fermenter. They’re affordable and really handy because the entire cover comes off, making it easy to pour in your mash, and it already has a space for an airlock.

2. At this point, you must add your yeast. Because the yeast is responsible for converting the sugars in the mash into alcohol, this is the most critical phase in the fermentation process. All that is required is the addition of a package of yeast (distilling yeast recommended because you will get more alcohol, moor moonshine, and a better tasting product). It only takes a little sachet of yeast (roughly 2.5 teaspoons if you have one large package). Once the yeast has been incorporated into the mash, all that is required is a gentle stir or a gentle shake of the container.

  • 3.
  • If you do not already have an airlock, it is highly suggested that you get one as soon as possible; they are not costly (usually around a dollar a piece you canpick one up here.) ***Please keep in mind that while the airlocks are virtually universal, the bungs are not.
  • Please see this page for more information on airlock and bung sizes.
  • At this stage, the mash and yeast should be in a fermenting container with an airlock on it.
  • Once the fermentation process has been completed for about a week, you may check the gravity of your mash using a hydrometer, and if you obtain the same result for 2 or 3 days in a row, you know the fermentation process has been completed.
  • Even while it is not required to have one from the outset, it might be a beneficial tool later on (especially for knowing the alcohol percentage of your finished moonshine).

You will require different ones, though, for testing your mash and your moonshine production (one can test low alcoholic percentage and another can test high). Click here to view a mash recipe, and here to view an aliquor/moonshine recipe.

Step 6: Distillation

Now that the mash has been fermented, the alcohol content should range between 8 and 20 percent, depending on the type of yeast you employed. After that, it’s time to transform your mash into some good ol’ fashioned moonshine whiskey! Distillation is the process of separating the alcohol present in the mash from the water. If you are still uncertain about how distillation works or how a still works, please have a look at the rest of this webpage. If you have a correctly constructed still (for more information on still construction, please see this still tutorial), you are ready to begin; all you need is a source of heat.

  1. Now that the mash has been fermented, the alcohol content should range between 8 and 20 percent, depending on the yeast you employed. Your mash is ready to be transformed into some good ol’ fashioned moonshine whiskey! Alcohol in the mash is separated from water during distillation. It is recommended that you read this page if you are still unclear about the process of distillation or about the operation of a still. The only thing you will need is a source of heat if you have a correctly constructed still (for more information on stills, please see this still guide). There’s nothing complicated about the procedure.

It’s time to celebrate because you just completed your first still runmade some good homemade moonshine!

“Moonshine” is a type of alcoholic beverage made from the fermented sugar of malt grains such as oats, cornmeal, or wheat. Moonshine is a powerful alcoholic beverage with a simple formula, which has helped it to become famous over the years as something that can be created by both amateur and professional distillers. Even though there are a plethora of great (and tasty!) moonshine recipes out there, here is a basic one that can be customized to suit the items you have on hand or your personal taste preferences.

When you combine flour and water, you get a combination known as a “mash.” Mashes are also utilized in the production of other alcoholic beverages, such as whiskey.

Prior to distilling, you can strain the mash to remove any solid husks or plant debris that has accumulated.

The alcohol may be removed from the water using a distillation process, and you can enjoy your own superb handmade whiskey as a result of using either the mash or the wash.

  • It is difficult for corn meal to filter out of a wash, and a cornmeal mash can cause the bottom of a copper still to burn. The greatest alcohol proof is found in the first product produced in a distillation batch. Using a hydrometer, you may check the progress of your yeast fermentation and the amount of alcohol in your mash.

Step 1: Research and Purchase Ingredients

Recipe for a Simple Moonshine Mash

  • The following ingredients: 5 gallons of malt grains (rye, barley, or a mix of grains)
  • 1 packet of bread yeast
  • 10 pounds sugar (any type)
  • 5 gallons warm water

For this reason, there are no set proportions for the various components in moonshine – it may take a lot of trial and error to discover a formula that is both tasty and will work well in your moonshine still. If you want to make moonshine at home, here are some recipes to get you started. Over the years, the majority of people have measured grains in 5-gallon grain buckets, and it is typically still the most common measurement offered because stills are also measured in gallons. Some recipes ask for the use of yeast, while others demand for the use of sugar.

After a few trials, you may discover that one type of fermenter is preferable to another for your needs.

In order to manufacture moonshine, it is preferable to use distilled water, because you know that distilled water will not include any pollutants that might interfere with the fermentation process, as well as the flavor and alcohol level of your finished product.

Step 2: Prepare Mash

To make the beer, mix around 5 pounds of sugar with 1-2 gallons of malt grain in a fermentation chamber. To dissolve the sugar, add warm water until it is completely dissolved – the water should be warm enough to dissolve the sugar but not hot enough to kill the yeast. As the sugar melts, continue to stir the mixture. Continue to stir as you add the remaining grains, sugar, and water to the pot.. Continue to whisk until all of the sugar has dissolved.

Step 3: Wait for Fermentation

Covering the fermentation container while still allowing the mash to “breathe” is essential. If you allow the fermentation process (also known as “clearing” the mash) to take its course naturally, it can take up to 2 weeks for all of the yeast to have converted as much sugar into alcohol as possible. However, by using a product such as Turbo Clear, you can reduce your fermentation time to as little as 4 days in some cases. When the bubbles are large and take a long time to reach the top of the container, you may want to check to see if your mash is ready to be distilled.

  1. It is possible to flavor moonshines while they are being mashed, and there are hundreds of recipes that describe how to incorporate different ingredients into the mash to produce moonshines with a variety of textures, flavors, and potencies.
  2. Cocktails can be made with flavored moonshines, and they can also be used in a variety of recipes such as stews, desserts, dressings and more.
  3. Enjoy experimenting with different moonshine recipes, and remember to always consume moonshine responsibly.
  4. Logan Ingalls and Josh Rubin are credited with the photographs.

How To Make A Simple Mash For Moonshine * Moonshine How To

You may easily manufacture moonshine by following the steps in this article. The simplicity of this mash for moonshine makes it an excellent choice for a sacrifice run when breaking in a new still because it is very inexpensive to produce. A wonderful way to get started brewing corn whiskey is with this recipe, which will allow you to become acquainted with the mash-making process without breaking the bank. Some may refer to this as a “sugar wash.”

“Try this: I’ve done 7 runs of this recipe and it produces an excellent result . But first, a few words about Bourbon whiskey, ’cause ya cant just whip up any whiskey and call it bourbon.

* Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
* Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
* Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
* Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels.
* Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
* Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
* Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.
* Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
* If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.
* Only whiskey produced in the United States can be called bourbon.

In practice, almost all bourbons marketed today are made from more than two-thirds corn, have been aged at least four years, and do qualify as “”straight bourbon””””with or without the “”straight bourbon”” label. The exceptions are inexpensive commodity brands of bourbon aged only three years and pre-mixed cocktails made with straight bourbon aged the minimum two years. However, a few small distilleries market bourbons aged for as little as three months. <- this might be you

this is my Carolina Bourbon ….and it’s fine tastin’
5-6 gallon wash yield.

I Start with 7 pounds of cracked corn, n cook in 4 gallons of good water for at least an hour (i usually go 90 mins) at a low simmer. …careful not to burn it.
*optional – you may add a half pound of 6-row malted barley while cooking the corn to loosen it up a bit ( this is called pre-mashing) as it gets very thick.
Then cool to exactly 150f.
Pour into a large cooler (helps conserve heat during the mashing session)
Add 3 pounds of 6-row malted barley …The temp should drop to approx 145f
…stir well every 15 mins, while you mash for 2-3 hours. Keep covered.

* Note: Don’t add malted barley to the corn if it exceeds 155f! the enzymes will be denatured in short order and and you won’t get no conversion.the mashing process requires that you keep the mash at 145f +/- 5f for the entire duration of the mash session which is why you use the insulated cooler.

*optional – If you want, you can add a lil beano (we’ll look the other way)for additional conversion…and let it continue to mash overnight.

At the end of the mash, cool to 80f and transfer to fermenter (grain and all).
Top up to 6-7 gallons total volume.
Aerate well and pitch yeast (Prestige WD or your favorite yeast).
Ferment for a week on grain.
After fermentation is complete, strain out grain, and transfer wash to boiler. No need to let the wash clear.

*Note: I use a 5 gallon nylon paint strainer bag to separate the grain from the wash.

I distilled with my Bok (removed a lil packing so the spirits are 80% )….make appropriate cuts and dilute final spirits to 60% abv using good water.

I oaked at 60% with 2 pcs of my own new charred white oak sticks for 6 months in a glass jar (once again, we’ll look the other way if you dont have a barrel). As long as you’re using new charred white oak I think you can call it Bourbon.
Once your agin’/oaking is complete, dilute down to 45% and bottle.”

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